12andus and a Freebie!

Do you guys remember Angela Kaufman, author of “Queen Up! Reclaim Your Crown When Life Knocks You Down”? (I interviewed her in March 2018.) She reached out to me about a website that she’s been doing some writing for called 12andus.com. Angela thought you guys might be interested in it.

So, what is 12andus.com? From their website:

Astrology is neither an exact science nor is it deterministic. However, through astrology we can know ourselves deeply. Astrology can uncover aspects of ourselves that might be difficult for us to see through other means. Astrology is the reverberation on the inner plane of the outer planets.

We created 12andus to help people reveal their unique astrological birth qualities and how they match with others. Every relationship, just like every individual person, is a unique constellation of compatibilities and qualities.

We can match another person on many levels: romantic, friendship, business, and spiritual. When we are with a certain person, our connection becomes almost like an independent entity with its own traits. With different people, we may feel practical, affectionate, artistic, sensual, and adventurous, or we may feel lazy, superficial, and argumentative.

12andus will show you the harmonic and conflictual qualities that exist between any two people. In addition to the individual birth reports and relationship reports, we offer forecasts and relationship forecasts.

Another aspect of 12andus’ mission is to collect surveys and big data to statistically demonstrate that astrology works. Research and discovery are our ultimate goals.

Basic membership is free, but I’ve been given a promotional link that will allow people who sign up for the site through it to get the premium membership for free! Premium membership allows access to more personalized reports and chart comparisons with other users as well as access to transit interpretations and tips for the day based on current transits. (This link is specific to The Magical Buffet. I make no money from its use; it is solely for tracking purposes. This promotion ends 10/15/2019.)

If you’re interested in checking out 12andus.com, click here!

Think Before You Pink 2019

Pinkwasher: (pink’-wah-sher) noun. A company or organization that claims to care about breast cancer by promoting a pink ribbon product, but at the same time produces, manufactures, and/or sells products that are linked to the disease.

Corporate giant 3M markets pink ribbon Post-its to raise awareness of breast cancer, but 3M also produces and uses PFAS, a toxic class of compounds known as forever chemicals that may contribute to breast cancer risk. Breast Cancer Action calls this pinkwashing.

What are PFAS? Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) are a large and ever-expanding class of highly fluorinated synthetic chemicals used to repel oil and water. Known for their extreme persistence, they are also called forever chemicals. PFOA and PFOS are two of the oldest and most well-studied chemicals in this group. These chemicals do not naturally break down over time.

There is no way to avoid exposure to PFAS and 98% of Americans have at least one PFAS chemical in their body. The drinking water of approximately 110 million Americans contains unsafe levels of PFAS, and the chemicals have been found in both breast and cow’s milk. PFAS are also found in food, consumer products, workplaces, and dust.

The weight of the evidence shows that PFAS may increase the risk of breast cancer. One of 3M’s own consultants warned that the chemical used for years in Scotchgard “is one of the strongest cancer promoters I’ve ever seen” and interferes with the ability of cells to communicate with each other. PFAS are known to cause some cancers and interfere with normal hormone functioning. In addition, PFAS have been shown to suppress the immune system, which can hinder the body’s ability to prevent rogue cells from growing into breast cancer. Even low dose exposure to PFAS changes the structure of the mammary gland and interferes with breastfeeding.

3M pioneered this dangerous class of chemicals and the company’s fortunes were built on the development, manufacture, and sale of PFOS and PFOA. Today, 3M is a $120 billion multinational corporation with profits driven by the development of newer PFAS compounds. For nearly seventy years, 3M has covered up the risks of PFAS from the public and regulators, protecting their profits at the cost of public health. One lawsuit charges 3M “maliciously conspired” with trade groups to conceal the chemicals’ toxicity. Through a range of delay and deny tactics, 3M prevented regulation, all the while pushing PFAS into new consumer products. As a result, current and future generations continue to be exposed to these dangerous chemicals. 3M has developed newer so-called “short chain” PFAS chemicals, to replace PFOA and PFOS. But a new report reveals that 3M submitted reports to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) showing health risks for 21 of these newer PFAS chemicals it makes. Despite industry’s claims about the relative safety of newer PFAS, there is evidence that these newer chemicals are not safe for humans or the environment. Instead of cleaning up their business to show us they care about breast cancer, 3M is continuing to contribute to a forever problem.

In one study, dying cancer patients were given extremely high doses of PFOA in 2008–2011 despite scant evidence that it would help their cancer or improve their quality of life. Results from this unethical research were never published, and to date, data about the patients’ cancer has never been presented. But instead of disavowing the study, 3M recently harvested the data and paid for re-analysis, which they’re now using to make unsupportable claims that PFOA may not be as persistent as previous studies have shown.

3M claims to be a good corporate citizen and has run several breast cancer promotions over the years, including pink hard hats and tape. In addition to marketing pink ribbon Post-its, 3M is currently selling pink stethoscopes to “help the fight against breast cancer.” 3M says their pink products are a “reminder for a good cause.” But they’re just trying to distract us from the fact that 3M’s toxic forever chemicals cause cancer, suppress the immune system, disrupt hormones, and change the structure of the mammary gland.

Tell 3M’s executives to stop producing, using, and selling PFAS!

Marketing pink products isn’t enough. If 3M really cares about breast cancer, they will put our health before their PFAS-driven profits.

Learn more, and take action at: https://bcaction.org/NeverForeverChems/

(Information provided by Breast Cancer Action. Emphasis on phrases is my own.)

The Hearth Witch’s Kitchen Herbal

If you know me, you know I love food. Thusly, when I’m given the chance to review any book with the potential to end with food, I’m there! That brings us to today’s review of “The Hearth Witch’s Kitchen Herbal: Culinary Herbs, for Magic, Beauty, and Health” by Anna Franklin.

“The Hearth Witch’s Kitchen Herbal” is nice because it focuses on ingredients that most people already have in their kitchen. Franklin gives a nice overview of each herb including its planetary associations, elemental correspondences, magical virtues, and associated deities. She goes on to talk about how to use the herb for cooking, cosmetics, and healing. The best part is at the end of each entry is recipes! And why yes, I did try one.

The internet is all about turmeric these days, so I decided to try making “Golden Milk”. It didn’t require too many ingredients. (Sadly, the recipe called for cinnamon, which I didn’t have at the time.)


Warm coconut milk with spices. Steep. Strain. Stir in honey. Enjoy! It tasted pretty good. I bet it would have been better with the cinnamon…


You can learn more here.

Shop your local indie bookstore <---This is an affiliate link to IndieBound, which supports independent bookstores throughout the United States. If you use this link to purchase the book, I will make a small commission at no additional cost to you.

It’s New! It’s Witchy!

We’re in the home stretch of the year! Halloween, Samhain, Día de Muertos, Thanksgiving, Christmas, and Yule are all approaching. To make celebrating all these holidays easier, The Magical Buffet has launched a new line of limited-edition merchandise! Whether you want to give a gift to yourself, a friend, or your favorite hostess, we’ve got you covered.

Flasks for your spirits.


Mugs for your witch’s brew.


Shot glasses for more of your spirits.


Decorative tiles, because they look cool.


All these things, and more, are available for purchase until December 31, 2019 at The Magical Buffet’s CafePress store!

https://www.cafepress.com/themagicalbuffet

Odin & the Nine Realms Oracle

Like many of you, I have a wicked tarot/oracle addiction. And so, like many of you, I have a crap ton of decks. All of this is to say, at this point I try to get decks that seem truly unique, and I have one to share with you today.

“Odin & the Nine Realms Oracle” by Sonja Grace is a delightful mix of intuitive and traditional deck design. The art is done by the deck’s author/designer and is an inspired mash up of her Norwegian and Native American heritage. The deck features 54 cards of well-known Norse deities like Odin, Freya, and Thor; an assortment of runes, and of course the Nine Realms of Asgard, Midgard, Vanaheim, Jotunheim, Nlflheim, Muspelheim, Alfheim, Svartalfheim, and Hel.

As with all oracle decks, my preferred method of use is the single card draw. And since the deck comes with a substantial book, featuring card images for each card in the deck, looking up card interpretations is easy. It also features 8 spreads that work with the deck. The companion book is sturdy and will hold up under repeated use and the book and deck fit into a solid cardboard box that has one of those nice magnetic closures. Like all decks I’ve seen lately, my one concern is the card stock. The cards look beautiful, but they feel a bit thin, so I worry about how they’ll hold up under heavy usage.

When everything is said and done, “Odin & the Nine Realms Oracle” is a unique and interesting take on the oracle deck. Its obvious audience is anyone interested in Norse mythology, but is wonderful for anyone looking for something different to add to their collection.

You can learn more here.

Shop your local indie bookstore <---This is an affiliate link to IndieBound, which supports independent bookstores throughout the United States. If you use this link to purchase the book, I will make a small commission at no additional cost to you.

Banned Books Week 2019

Banned Books Week is an annual event celebrating the freedom to read. Typically held during the last week of September, it spotlights current and historical attempts to censor books in libraries and schools. It brings together the entire book community — librarians, booksellers, publishers, journalists, teachers, and readers of all types — in shared support of the freedom to seek and to express ideas, even those some consider unorthodox or unpopular.

The books featured during Banned Books Week have all been targeted for removal or restriction in libraries and schools. By focusing on efforts across the country to remove or restrict access to books, Banned Books Week draws national attention to the harms of censorship.

For those of you who are curious, this short video shows the 11 most challenged books of the past year.




You can learn more about Banned Books Week at http://www.ala.org/advocacy/bbooks

Want to support independent bookstores and shop the top 10 most challenged books of the past decade? Then shop the links below! (These are affiliate links to IndieBound, which supports independent bookstores throughout the United States. If you use these links to purchase books, I will make a small commission at no additional cost to you.)

NUMBER ONE
NUMBER ONE

NUMBER TWO
NUMBER TWO

NUMBER THREE
NUMBER THREE

NUMBER FOUR
NUMBER FOUR

NUMBER FIVE
NUMBER FIVE

NUMBER SIX
NUMBER SIX

NUMBER 7
NUMBER 7

NUMBER EIGHT
NUMBER EIGHT

NUMBER NINE
NUMBER NINE

NUMBER TEN
NUMBER TEN

International Talk Like a Pirate Day 2019

Ahoy mateys! It be International Talk Like a Pirate Day! A day to celebrate pirates of the past, and it’s a high holy day for the Church of the Flying Spaghetti Monster! This holiday has been acknowledged on The Magical Buffet website nearly every year since we switched to the blog format! As the holiday approached, I did an informal poll on social media as to whether I should bother with the holiday, and if so, what I should say.

In a not so surprising turn, everyone wants to see some rum! Of course, then I was left wondering what rum thing I was going to write. As with all matter’s alcohol, I turned to the Master Po to my Kwai Chang Caine, Warren Bobrow. (You may remember we spoke about rum on a previous International Talk Like a Pirate Day.) I reached for “The Craft Cocktail Compendium” he wrote and found what I was looking for!

Sailor’s Friend
This toddy is built with simple, honest materials that haven’t changed much over the years: hot water, a large dose of spiced rum, and lemon – a trinity that can’t help but hasten the old closed-eye relaxation. And we have seamen of yore to thank for the popularity: Sailors whose watch was scheduled for the middle of the night would have to force themselves to sleep during the day, whether they liked it or not. This historically accurate toddy would have been a sailor’s best friend when cold, misty weather made it difficult to get some shut-eye. Plus, honey has been used as an expectorant since Roman times. Today, it’s still a powerful ally against scratchy sore throats and those pesky, chesty coughs that can keep you tossing and turning at night.


Turns out the recipe is super easy. Warm up a mug with hot water. Dump out the water. Pour yourself 3 ounces of dark, spiced rum. Top off your mug some more boiling water. Add honey to taste and lemon to prevent scurvy!


Considering how long I’ve been a rum drinker, it’s incredible that I’ve never tried a toddy type rum drink before. It’s delicious! Also, warm lemon smells delicious. Every time I put the mug to my lips I inhale deeply. I suspect I’ll be drinking these all winter long.

And there ye’ have it me hardies, rum for International Talk Like a Pirate Day!

Consider showing the always amazing Warren Bobrow some love by checking out his books on IndieBound.org! (These are affiliate links to IndieBound, which supports independent bookstores throughout the United States. If you use these links to purchase a book, I will make a small commission at no additional cost to you.)

Cannabis Cocktails, Mocktails & Tonics
Cannabis Cocktails, Mocktails & Tonics

The Craft Cocktail Compendium
The Craft Cocktail Compendium

Apothecary Cocktails
Apothecary Cocktails

Women of the Reformation

The latest issue of Christian History Magazine is available now. I wanted to bring it to your attention due to its look at women who played a role in well, Christian history.

This issue, #131, titled: Women of the Reformation: Lesser-known stories, features women who are not as well known, including a printer, Margarethe Prüss; preachers, Katherine Schütz Zell and Marie Dentière; pamphlet writer, Argula von Grumbach; mystic, Ursula Jost and others, alongside Katie Luther, who pioneered the brand new role/profession of pastor’s wife and Anna Bullinger, whose husband Heinrich’s courtship letters formed the basis of the only lengthy excerpt from a male theologian in this issue.

Prominent queens of the sixteenth century are included in the issue, such as Marguerite de Navarre and Jeanne d’Albret of France and all the six wives of England’s Henry VIII – the three Catherines, two Annes, one Jane and his two daughters, Mary and Elizabeth.

Articles in this issue are:

No simple story by Jennifer Powell McNutt – How women’s roles changed in the sixteenth century

“Honorable and holy” by Heinrich Bullinger – Bullinger’s book on Christian marriage was a best-seller

Like mother, like daughter? By S. Amanda Eurich – Marguerite de Navarre and Jeanne d’Albret shaped French religion for generations

“A very useful epistle”: Marie Dentière by Mary B. McKinley – In 2002 Dentière received belated recognition; her name was added to the Wall of the Reformers in Geneva.

Our first woman reformer by Peter Matheson – Argula von Grumbach proclaimed “no woman’s chit-chat, but the Word of God”

Not a soap opera by Calvin Lane – The women of the English Reformation were active participants in a theological drama

She would follow only Christ by Elsie McKee – From pamphlet writing to pastoral counsel, Katharina Schütz Zell fought for her right to speak

“Christ is the master”: Margaret Blaurer by Edwin Woodruff Tait – Blaurer was of use to the church as a single woman.

Dangerous pamphlets by Kirsi Stjerna – Margarethe Prüss helped advance the radical Reformation through her publishing

“God my Lord is even stronger” by Rebecca Giselbrecht – Exemplary women of the Reformation with confidence in their convictions

“The gates of Hell cannot prevail” by Argula von Grumbach – Von Grumbach’s letter to the University of Ingolstadt protesting the arrest and exile of Arsacius Seehofer for holding Lutheran views, excerpted here, became her most famous and best-selling piece of writing

Issue #131, contains 14 feature articles and shorter side-bar articles; a chronology timeline; an archive of rare artwork & photos; a ‘letter to the editor’ section and an extensive reading list compiled by the CH editorial staff. The magazine is available on-line and can be conveniently read on screen at: https://christianhistoryinstitute.org/magazine.

10 Questions with Mallorie Vaudoise

Today we’re talking with Mallorie Vaudoise, author of “Honoring Your Ancestors”. We talk about family, mediumship, Italian magic, and more!

1. What is ancestor veneration?

Any spiritual practice that connects us with the people who were here before us is a form of ancestor veneration. This could take the form of prayer, ritual, and offerings. Or it could take the form of genealogical research, cooking traditional foods, and playing folk music.

Ancestor veneration is found throughout the world. Even within our own culture, which I consider spiritually impoverished, we still see the impulse to hold funerary rituals, create memorials, and leave offerings of flowers at cemeteries.

My book is about adding new depth and color to these simple actions. It’s also about grounding your magical practice in a loving relationship with these powerful spirits who have a vested interest in you as their descendant.

2. What sparked your interest in working with ancestors?

I was a weird kid. Some of that weirdness was unique to me. But in retrospect, some of it was a failure to integrate messages that I was receiving from spirits through mediumship. I didn’t have a framework for understanding the weird physical and emotional sensations that I now associate with spirit contact. And yet, there were some things that I could perceive, like the presence of my great-grandparents around me.

As an adult, I became involved in two lineages of African-diasporic traditions. Both traditions required me to undergo rituals aimed at nourishing and seeking the blessing of my ancestors before I could be initiated. They gave me a practical understanding of the phenomena that I had experienced throughout my life. It was life changing. I wanted to share the gift of ancestral consciousness with other people, outside of any traditional lineage. That’s why I wrote the book: as a guide for people who don’t have the benefit of a tradition or teacher, so they can find their own path. Or for people who are working within a tradition but want to further develop their ancestor veneration practice into something more personal.

3. In your book you explain there are different types of ancestors. Can you explain this for our readers?

When we think of ancestors, sometimes we assume these are always blood relations. I definitely think there is an inherent power in connecting with your parents, grandparents, great-grandparents, etc. because they made your body with their bodies. So, as ancestors, they are connected to the great Mysteries of incarnation: birth, death, and rebirth.

But there are other types of ancestors that we may honor as well. For example, the ancestors of an initiatic lineage might consider you their descendant as much as your blood ancestors if you ritually died and were reborn as their godchild. We also have connections to ancestors that come about without ritual initiation that I refer to as “affinity ancestors”. And of course, there are other spirits of dead humans that we might incorporate into our ancestor veneration practice, like saints and spirit guides.

At the end of the day, they’re your ancestors. You get to decide who you honor and how. You’re already the high priest/ess of this religion. That means you have the power and the responsibility to honor them in a way that works for both sides of the equation.

4. Can ancestor veneration be incorporated into any spiritual practice?

If you’ve got ancestors, you can venerate them. How you do it and how it relates to your other spiritual practices is entirely up to you.

5. Is making offerings a requirement of ancestor veneration? What constitutes an offering?

I don’t think there are any universal requirements in ancestor veneration. But offerings can be profoundly meaningful for many people, especially for those of us who were raised never to show up to a party empty-handed.

An offering is anything given as a gift to your ancestors. This could be incense, food, or flowers. It could be the sacrifice of time or money to charity. I consider writing this book the biggest offering I’ve made to the ancestors to date.

6. You talk about mediumship as part of ancestor veneration in the book. What is mediumship?

Ancestor veneration is a two-way street. If prayers and offerings are communication in one direction, then mediumship is communication in the other direction.

Unlike other spirits, our ancestors were all once human. They remember what it’s like to have a body, to go hungry, to fall in love, to stub their toes, to feel feelings, and to have dreams. Just like us, they once chose to come here and learn the lessons that can only be learned through a human body. But their day was different from our day, and their lessons where different from our lessons. Through mediumship, they can share their learnings with us so we can be free to focus on the new lessons we have come here to experience.

7. Can anyone perform mediumship, or do you need to have special gifts to do it?

Anyone can perform mediumship. But what that looks like for you may differ from what it looks like for me. Some people see spirits. Some people hear them. I am always shocked to find how many people feel them physically like I do.

I’ve met mediums who can give hard facts, like names and dates, through mediumship. I’m not that type of medium. But names and dates wouldn’t be terribly helpful for me anyway. I need guidance on how to accomplish the unique work that my spirit chose to incarnate for. Names and dates aren’t going to help me with that.

Mediumship is like any other skill. Anyone can do it. Not everyone can do it in the same way. But ultimately, if you want to get better at it, you have to practice it.

8. You have a beautiful website, Italian Folk Magic. What inspired you to create a site devoted to the subject matter?

I’m Italian-American. Growing up, it felt like my family was haunted by Italy. I was raised with stories about how difficult my grandparents and great-grandparents’ lives were, both in Italy and when they immigrated to the United States. But at the same time, it was almost taboo to talk about our heritage. That tension between the depth of gratitude that I was taught to show and the shame my family had acquired about our roots led me to go searching for our ancestral traditions. I wanted to find the things we had sacrificed to become American: the passion, the ecstasy, the magic.

At the time, there were very few resources on the topic in English. Now, I see more and more Italian-Americans proudly embracing their heritage in the form of traditional herbalism, devotion to the saints, and yes, folk magic. I like to think my site played a small part in inspiring other Italian-Americans to explore their roots.

9. What’s next? Do you have any upcoming projects my readers can look forward to?

Right now, I’m focused on getting Honoring Your Ancestors to as many people as possible. Your readers can stay a part of that conversation by following me on Instagram and Facebook.

I think of myself as a missionary for the spirit world. I started with the ancestors because people were already asking me about them. But I’d like to start writing more about other types of spirits: spirits of place, for example. Ultimately, the goal of all of my projects is to remind people that they are not alone. We are all connected with each other and with a vast ecosystem which includes every other living organism as well as discarnate spirits.

10. Parting shot! Ask us here at The Magical Buffet any one questions!

What’s the most important thing you’ve learned from a dead person?

“Don’t check the value of your retirement accounts daily, it will just make you crazy. You’ve got a long time to retirement.” That’s what my father always said, and now my day job is working for a financial advisor and seriously, a lot of people would be a lot happier if they followed this advice.

About Mallorie Vaudoise:
Mallorie Vaudoise is a NYC-based spiritualist of Italian descent. She is the author of Honoring Your Ancestors: A Guide to Ancestral Veneration (Llewellyn, 2019) and Italian Folk Magic, a blog about devotional practices from Southern Italy and Sicily. She is an initiated Olorisha (Orisha priestess) and an apprentice in the ecstatic music and dance traditions of her ancestors. She believes that music, food, wine, and kissing are vital tools of spiritual evolution. Visit Mallorie online at www.roadsideomens.com or follow her Instagram account @honoringyourancestors.

<---Shop your local indie bookstoreThis is an affiliate link to IndieBound, which supports independent bookstores throughout the United States. If you use this link to purchase the book, I will make a small commission at no additional cost to you.

Backwoods Witchcraft

“Backwoods Witchcraft: Conjure & Folk Magic from Appalachia” by Jake Richards paints a vivid picture of life in Appalachia. He pulls you into a land of rough living, enchanted untouched places, folklore, and magical practices. A place where the Bible is equal parts magical text and religious philosophy.

“Backwoods Witchcraft” is written in a conversational tone. Although Richards divided the book into sections, you’ll find quite a bit of overlap in subject matter. This can be forgiven because as you read you’ll find that Appalachian folk magic infuses everything in the practitioner’s life; from the foods you choose to eat to the clothes you opt to wear.

Personally, I loved reading about how the Bible is used for magical incantation. It made me look at the Bible with fresh eyes. “Backwoods Witchcraft” is also loaded with tons of little things you could incorporate into your everyday life. However, Richards wrote the book in the hopes that others would pick up the torch of Appalachian folk magic, a magic that is apparently dying out in practice in its traditional homeland.

“Backwoods Witchcraft” is a well-written, entertaining, and informative read.

You can learn more here.

Shop your local indie bookstore <---This is an affiliate link to IndieBound, which supports independent bookstores throughout the United States. If you use this link to purchase the book, I will make a small commission at no additional cost to you.