The Beauty Witch’s Secrets

If you follow me on social media, it’s no secret that I love skincare and cosmetics. So you’ll understand that once I heard about “The Beauty Witch’s Secrets: Recipes & Rituals for the Modern Goddess” by Alise Marie I had to request a copy to review. Marie has created a book with a little bit of something for anyone interested in beauty.

Looking for some useful, practical advice? Want to learn to make your own skincare? Recipes for some beauty enhancing beverages? Ready to turn your skincare routine into ritual? Alise Marie has ALL that and more in “The Beauty Witch’s Secrets.” Even if you’re someone like me and settled in on a regular skincare routine, Marie offers plenty of tips and insights that you’ll want to try out and perhaps make your routine a little more magical.

Have you ever wished you could sit around and talk beauty with your fabulous witch girlfriend? Alise Marie is that girlfriend and “The Beauty Witch’s Secrets” is the start of that conversation.

You can learn more here.

Get your own copy here. (This is an affiliate link to my Bookshop, which supports independent bookstores throughout the United States. If you use this link to purchase the book, I will make a small commission at no additional cost to you.)

Do you enjoy The Magical Buffet? Considering supporting The Magical Buffet on Patreon! For only $5 a month you’ll receive monthly tarot/oracle forecasts, classes, and behind the scenes updates! Https://www.patreon.com/magicalbuffet

Blackthorn’s Protection Magic

Amy Blackthorn is an overachieving bitch. Yes, I said it. Yes, you can quote me. Before reading her latest book “Blackthorn’s Protection Magic”, I knew her merely as a certified aromatherapist, purveyor of Hoodoo based herbal tea blends, a capable bartender, and obviously a respected author with this being her sixth book published from Weiser. Now I also know she has taught self-defense classes since attaining the rank of black belt in 2002 and has been a certified firearms instructor since 2010. Oh, and she’s also super nice and has an adorable dog. So yes, an overachieving not so bitchy bitch.

Some of you may remember that a LONG time ago I gave a talk about the everyman’s guide to protection magic at a handful of events. I did quite a bit of research for it and honestly, not only did I feel it was quite complete, but so did most attendees. Well, that was before an accomplished witch and oh, did I mention a witch with an extensive career in executive security, decided to write a book.

Blackthorn discusses both magical protection and mundane, “real world”, protection. “Blackthorn’s Protection Magic” is not for the faint of heart. She bravely tells first hand accounts of dicey situations she has encountered, and how she dealt with them. Most witchcraft books about protection will help you magically secure your home, rid yourself of curses or hexes, and overall, create some good vibes around yourself and your home. Blackthorn teaches you how to do all of that. Rarely do you encounter a book of this category that also discusses practical steps about self-defense classes, situational awareness, improvised weapons, and the like. But Blackthorn does that too.

Unsurprisingly, Amy Blackthorn continues to impress me with “Blackthorn’s Protection Magic”. It’s useful resource for anyone of any level of magic experience and a stand out of the genre.

You can learn more here.

Get your own copy here. (This is an affiliate link to my Bookshop, which supports independent bookstores throughout the United States. If you use this link to purchase the book, I will make a small commission at no additional cost to you.)

Do you enjoy The Magical Buffet? Considering supporting The Magical Buffet on Patreon! For only $5 a month you’ll receive monthly tarot/oracle forecasts, classes, and behind the scenes updates! Https://www.patreon.com/magicalbuffet

Paganism for Prisoners

Author and High Priestess Awyn Dawn discovered Paganism while incarcerated, and with her book “Paganism for Prisoners: Connecting to the Magic Within” she seeks to help those who are currently incarcerated start their journey.

Dawn espouses that magic comes within yourself, and there is nothing like being in jail to put a fine point on that. “Paganism for Prisoners” touches on the ways you may be restricted from access to traditional tools, etc. Dawn also offers wonderful DIY ideas for substitutes. You’ll find a thoughtful discussion on ethics and personal responsibility, rituals for one or more, divination, holidays, and more.

However, the common thread is that all you really need is you. It’s for this reason that I find “Paganism for Prisoners” a compelling introduction to Paganism and witchcraft for anyone. This is absolutely, 100%, hands down one of the best Paganism/Witchcraft 101 style books I have ever read.

You can learn more here.

Get your own copy here. (This is an affiliate link to my Bookshop, which supports independent bookstores throughout the United States. If you use this link to purchase the book, I will make a small commission at no additional cost to you.)

Do you enjoy The Magical Buffet? Considering supporting The Magical Buffet on Patreon! For only $5 a month you’ll receive monthly tarot/oracle forecasts, classes, and behind the scenes updates! Https://www.patreon.com/magicalbuffet

Goddess Magic

It is pretty well-known that I am a sucker for goddesses. That is why I didn’t’ bother looking into the details when offer the opportunity to read “Goddess Magic: A Handbook of Spells, Charms, and Rituals Divine in Origin” by Aurora Kane.

If you’re a more cautious sort and want to know more than that the word “Goddess” is in the title, I can help you out. Now I’m not going to sit here and claim that Kane invented a whole new system of magic, however she does an excellent job explaining the best way to incorporate magical basics into working with goddesses. Where “Goddess Magic” truly excels is in the curated selection of goddesses and Kane’s great ideas to work with them. I can hear you now, “What goddesses are in the book?” I’m glad you asked!

Eos/Aurora/Tesana, Freya, Hebe/Juventas, Inanna, Venus/Aphrodite, Corn Mother, Cybele, Danu, Demeter/Ceres, Hera/Juno, Isis, Mawu, Ninhursag, Oshun, Selene, Yemaya, Amaterasu, Clementia/Eleos, Iris, Kuan Yin, Ma’at, Rhiannon, Veritas/Aletheia, Airmid, Bao Gu, Brigid, Cerridwen, Nidra, Hestia/Vesta, Gabija, Frigg, Epione, Berchta, Fortuna/Tyche, Lakshmi, Pachamama, Rosmerta, Bastet/Bast, Artemis/Diana, Durga, Lady Xian, Nike/Victoria, Tara/Sgrol-ma, Athena/Minerva, Hathor, Baubo/Iambe, Ixchel, Laetitia, and yes, there are more that I didn’t list here!

Seriously, if you are into goddesses, like I am, you NEED “Goddess Magic.” If you’re interested in incorporating goddesses into your practice, you NEED “Goddess Magic.” If you think there isn’t a goddess out there for you, you’re wrong, and you NEED “Goddess Magic.” I guess what I’m saying is that you really need “Goddess Magic” by Aurora Kane.

You can learn more here.

Get your own copy here. (This is an affiliate link to my Bookshop, which supports independent bookstores throughout the United States. If you use this link to purchase the book, I will make a small commission at no additional cost to you.)

Do you enjoy The Magical Buffet? Considering supporting The Magical Buffet on Patreon! For only $5 a month you’ll receive monthly tarot/oracle forecasts, classes, and behind the scenes updates! Https://www.patreon.com/magicalbuffet

10 Questions with Cairelle Crow & Laura Louella (Giveaway)

What happens when you interview two different authors separately about the same thing? In this case, you find out that they really do work well together. Please enjoy this interview with Cairelle Crow and Laura Louella as we discuss the anthology book they edited, “Brigid’s Light”, and everything that entailed.

1. I’m guessing most of my readers are familiar with Brigid, but for those who are not, can you explain who she is?

Cairelle Crow: Brigid is first documented in the folklore, mythology, and spiritual traditions of the Celtic nations of Scotland, Ireland, Wales, Cornwall, the Isle of Man, and Brittany, as well as in England, where she is revered at numerous sacred sites. As a pre-Christian triple goddess of Ireland, she is an object of reverence over a wide expanse of northwestern Europe. She is also well-known as St. Brigid of Kildare. It is debated whether the saint is a continuation of the goddess, or whether the goddess and saint are completely different. Either way, many of her followers accept that the goddess and saint are inextricably entwined and it’s not unusual to see a mix of both traditions within one path.

Laura Louella: Brigid is multi-faceted. She is a mother, a daughter, a goddess and a saint. Her hearth fires blaze, she is the center. She has love and cares for the less fortunate. Brigid is a healer.

2. Why out of all the deities did you choose to devote an anthology to Brigid?

Cairelle Crow: While I work with a multitude of goddesses, Brigid is my matroness goddess and I wanted to honor her.

Laura Louella: I love her, she is at the heart of my home. She is a protectress, a humanitarian, lover of animals and she knows loss and grief. She is an example of how to live life.

3. Do you find there are any prevalent misconceptions about Brigid?

Cairelle Crow: Too many people mistakenly see Brigid as a “beginner” goddess, suitable only for those who need a gentle introduction to goddess spirituality and/or paganism. Brigid is multi-faceted and stands firmly within her boundaries and sovereignty. Her stories, myths, and legends reflect strength and determination. Practitioners of any level can learn from Brigid’s example.

Laura Louella: That she is a beginner goddess and only gentle. Some fail to see her many attributes, she stood up to power, she wasn’t afraid to face the hard things. She was not concerned about being popular when caring for the needs of others. And she showed her emotions and taught us how to as well.

4. Why an anthology, or compilation, instead of an entire book authored by yourself on the subject?

Cairelle Crow: There are so many perspectives on Brigid. I thought it would be great to highlight the many ways she is experienced by others. I was also interested in how she’s made her way around the world, traveling along with immigrants and through modern technology.

Laura Louella: There are so many people who love her, we wanted all the voices to shine their light on her.

5. How did you go about soliciting contributions for “Brigid’s Light”?

Cairelle Crow: We created a detailed request for submissions on our website and shared it on social media. We also asked others that we know are devotees and we asked them to write about their experiences.

Laura Louella: We reached out to people via social media, we contacted people we have studied with, and friends.

6. “Bridgid’s Light” was edited by both of you. How did that partnership come about and how did you divide the labor?

Cairelle Crow: We met when Laura picked me up from the airport. We were attending the same event and I needed a ride! We’d known each other online previously, and a close friendship developed after a discussion of our mutual devotion to Brigid. The anthology, from start to finish, was done together over Zoom sessions with a shared screen. We work well together, we shared a lot of laughs, and thoroughly enjoyed the process!

Laura Louella: We met when I picked up Cairelle at an airport in Oregon. We had met online but never in person. As we traveled back to California, we began sharing our stories, one conversation led to another and we began speaking of our devotion to Brigid. I believe Brigid brought us together and gave us the spark of inspiration we needed for Brigid’s Light.
We worked together, since we live in different time zones, we spent a lot of time on zoom! We wrote together, we edited together, and as the submissions came in, we rejoiced together. I will tell you that Cairelle is the tech person. Without that I would have struggled greatly. She walked me through some of the IT stuff with great patience.

7. There are loads of prayers, essays, and more in “Brigid’s Light.” Do you have a few personal favorites?

Cairelle Crow: Ohhh, this is hard! I love them all so much! Some that come to mind right in this moment are the poem by NiDara, Laura’s essay about her family’s quilting tradition, and Raven Morgaine’s beautiful portrayal of Maman Brijit. I also love Maria Jones’ essay about Brigid and astrology.

Laura Louella: It is so hard to choose a favorite. The one that made me cry is the submission from Bernadette Montana entitled My Personal Relationship with Brid. The one that reminded me that Brigid is always with us, by Tara Anura, Brigid of the Ozarks gave me a sense of knowing Brigid walks with us through great challenges. Love and Honey Baked Apples by Cairelle, I can feel the love in her grandma’s kitchen. Also, Jenne Micale’s, A Prayer to Brighid in Times of Violence, so profound and right now! I cannot choose one because everyone, all of the submissions shine a beautiful light on my beloved Brigid.

8. What do you think are some of the most basic ways to honor Brigid?

Cairelle Crow: The number one most basic way that I honor Brigid is to be of service to others, in whatever way is possible. Even offering a smile to another person on the street can be uplifting. Little things really matter! Other ways are keeping a flame, tending an altar that honors her, cooking a meal for loved ones. The possibilities are near-endless. People will know best what resonates within themselves.

Laura Louella: Watching the sun rise, sitting by a river or stream, lighting a candle and saying a prayer, tending my altar where I place my sacred items honoring her, and caring for others.

9. What’s next? Do you have any upcoming projects that my readers should be aware of?

Cairelle Crow: We are currently writing a book, we are planning retreats to Ireland and Glastonbury in 2023, and we continue to work on expanding our Elements of Philanthropy and Threads of Connection projects. Details about all of this can be found on our website, www.sanctuaryofbrigid.com.

Laura Louella: So much!! We are currently writing a book proposal that we are very excited about. We are planning on taking a group of women on a retreat to Ireland and Glastonbury, details are on www.sanctuaryofbrigid.com , where people that are interested can get on a list to be contacted about details. Also, on our website there is a page called Elements of Philanthropy where we encourage acts of service to honor Brigid.

10. Parting shot! Ask us at The Magical Buffet any one question.

Cairelle Crow: Do you have a matroness goddess? If so, who?

Not a particular individual goddess. I worship the divine feminine in many aspects. My altar pays homage to Quan Yin, Kali, Santa Muerte, Medusa, and Pandora.

Laura Louella: How do you see Brigid; do you have a story or recipe or poem that honors her?

I suspect many will find it surprising that I’ve never devoted much time to Brigid. It’s one of the reasons I wanted to read “Brigid’s Light.”

About Cairelle Crow:
Cairelle Crow has walked a goddess path for more than thirty years, exploring, learning, and growing. She is a priestess, genealogist, wanderess of wild and holy places, and co-foundress of the Sanctuary of Brigid and its flame-keeping circle, Sisters of the Flame. She lectures locally, nationally, and internationally on the blending of genealogy with magic and is dedicated to connecting magical people to their ancestral truths. When she’s not roaming the world in search of grandmothers, quirky art, and stone circles, Cairelle is home in New Orleans, where she lives joyfully, loves intensely, and laughs frequently with beloved family and friends. You can find her online at www.cairellecrow.com.

About Laura Louella:
Laura Louella is a priestess, certified Pilates instructor committed to teaching the strength that lies within, and the owner of Goddess Pilates, where she blends the art of sacred movement with the beauty of the goddess. She is also the co-foundress of the Sanctuary of Brigid and its flame-keeping circle, Sisters of the Flame. Many days, you can find her tending her garden, taking long walks through the forest, sitting by the river, or creating a quilt on her 1936 Featherweight Singer sewing machine. Laura lives in the Cascade Mountains of northern California.

You can learn more here.

Guess what? I accidentally received two copies of “Brigid’s Light”. You know what that means? GIVEAWAY! As usual, we’re using Rafflecopter. The giveaway is open to United States residents 18 years of age and old. Giveaway ends Monday 03/28/2022 at 11:59pm eastern.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Shop your local indie bookstore <---This is an affiliate link to my Bookshop, which supports independent bookstores throughout the United States. If you use this link to purchase the book, I will make a small commission at no additional cost to you.

Do you enjoy The Magical Buffet? Considering supporting The Magical Buffet on Patreon! For only $5 a month you’ll receive monthly tarot/oracle forecasts, classes, and behind the scenes updates! https://www.patreon.com/magicalbuffet

Witch, Please

When I agreed to review “Witch, Please: Empowerment and Enlightenment for the Modern Mystic” by Victoria Maxwell I was expecting a blunt, slightly crass, book of advice. And to me, that isn’t a bad thing. However, Maxwell isn’t the sassy straight-talker I was expecting. Instead, she’s you’re supportive, spiritual seeker sister. And that, is always nice.

Not to make this weird, but Maxwell is definitely a spiritual sister of The Magical Buffet. In her introduction Maxwell states, “I’ve always been a big believer in the ‘take what resonates and leave the rest approach’.” Old school Magical Buffet readers may recognize that as a more eloquent version of my original website’s theme, “Take what you want and leave the rest.” So obviously by page 5 I was sold on this book.

With that said, what are you interested in? “Witch, Please” gives you a veritable plethora of options to explore: relationship magic, meditation, cleansing, money magic, working with energies, creating a grimoire/journal, warding, tarot cards, and much more. Everything is presented clearly, with enough information to get you started and find if it’s something you wish to pursue.

People who have an established spiritual and/or magical practice may want to pass on “Witch, Please.” On the other hand, if you’re like me and always looking for new magical bits to add to your daily life, Victoria Maxwell wrote a great place to start.

You can learn more here.

Shop your local indie bookstore <---This is an affiliate link to IndieBound, which supports independent bookstores throughout the United States. If you use this link to purchase the book, I will make a small commission at no additional cost to you.

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Qabalah for Wiccans

Anyone who has had any interest in magic has stumbled across Qabalah. Unlike Jewish Kabbalah (a closed tradition to those of the Jewish faith), hermetic Qabalah is an appropriation of the tradition that blends Jewish theology, astrology, Hermeticism, and Neo-Platonic philosophy. It serves as the roots from which many initiatory lodge systems, such as the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn, arose. It can come across as overly complex, difficult to learn, and perhaps not entirely practical for those not interested in a formal ceremonial magic practice. However, in saunters Jack Chanek with his book “Qabalah for Wiccans: Ceremonial Magic on the Pagan Path,” and believe me, it changes EVERYTHING.

Trust me, I’m a lady that has looked into Qabalah. I’m an Israel Regardie fangirl (he founded the Golden Dawn). I’ve read the comic “Promethea” from Alan Moore (a ceremonial magician who wrote this comic centered around the Qabalah). Heck, I’m from a Jewish family, the Kabbalah should be in my DNA! Yet, the Qabalah has always remained foreign, alien, out of my grasp. But Chanek made Qabalah readily accessible. I’ve never been so exhilarated from a text. I get it! I got it! AMAZING!

Now, imagine finally getting Qabalah, and then finding out you can easily apply it to your Wiccan/Pagan practice! Chanek’s purpose in this book is to “show that Wicca and Qabalah are already compatible with each other,” and he succeeds. He writes from the perspective of British Traditional Wicca, but don’t worry, I’m decidedly not Wiccan and everything made sense. “Qabalah for Wiccans” has meditations, exercises, and rituals that will feel familiar to Wiccans, but help meld Qabalah with your practice.

To sum up, if you are ANYONE EVEN REMOTELY INTERESTED IN MAGIC, get “Qabalah for Wiccans” by Jack Chanek NOW!

You can learn more here.

Shop your local indie bookstore <---This is an affiliate link to IndieBound, which supports independent bookstores throughout the United States. If you use this link to purchase the book, I will make a small commission at no additional cost to you.

Do you enjoy The Magical Buffet? Considering supporting The Magical Buffet on Patreon! For only $5 a month you’ll receive monthly tarot/oracle forecasts, classes, and behind the scenes updates! https://www.patreon.com/magicalbuffet

10 Questions with Heather Greene

Today we’re talking with editor, author, and journalist Heather Greene about her latest book, “Lights, Camera, Witchcraft: A Critical History of Witches in American Film and Television.”

1. Your latest book is “Lights, Camera, Witchcraft: A Critical History of Witches in American Film and Television.” I guess the most obvious question here is, why explore this particular facet of history?

Stories of witches and witchcraft permeate so much of our culture across time and space. It is a fascination that is made of both adoration and fear, it would seem. In this study, I examined how American pop culture, specifically Hollywood and television, told these age-old stories and defined the character of the witch.

2. Your book discusses a dizzying volume of movies and television shows. Do you have any idea how much time you spent watching movies as research?

I could do some math based on the average length of shows and movies, but no, I do not have a number. In fact, in some cases, I watched the films or shows multiple times for analysis, and I also watched a good number of films not listed or mentioned. So basically, the answer is “a whole lot.”

3. How has the role of women in American culture been reflected by the role of the witch in film?

This is actually one of the main threads in the book. In short, witchcraft is more often than not an allegory for a woman’s or girl’s power. Therefore, the witch character reflects mainstream society’s relationship with that power at any given point in time. When her innate power is feared as in mid-century, the witch is an example of what not to be. When it’s celebrated as in the 1990s, witchcraft is a symbol of feminist expression or so called ‘girl power’. This is just a taste of a complex social history.

4. Overall, how has the witch in cinema evolved?

Again, this is the main thrust of the book itself. A quick answer: the witch began as a copy of stories and lore that had come before and expanded over time with a changing society. Her stories became more involved, more focused on her as a central character, and more nuanced in the definition of magic itself. The witch evolved into a uniquely Hollywood creation and a true reflection of American society’s negotiation of religion, gender, race, ethnicity, and power.

5. Has the portrayal of men as witches been a part of your research?

Yes. While women make up most of Hollywood’s witches, there are some standout male figures, and that needs to be discussed as well. Given that witches have long been associated with women within Western society in general, it is important to examine male representations and the roles that they play. There is a distinct difference and I discuss that point in the book.

6. Do you remember the first witch you saw in American film or television?

I would guess it would be Glinda and The Wicked Witch of the West. I loved The Wizard of Oz. However, it may have been Sabrina the Teenage Witch in her cartoon form or a Disney animated witch.

7. Who’s your favorite fictional witch?

The Wicked Witch of the West, although I’m partial to Looney Tunes’ Witch Hazel and Disney’s Maleficent.

8. Now that you’re done with this book, what are you watching on television?

I’ve been watching some wonderful British films that have absolutely nothing to do with witchcraft. British filmmakers have a wonderful way of telling compelling slice of life stories. The Beautiful Fantastic is one example. However, I did just start watching The Wheel of Time, which is in fact a great addition to the story of the witch on screen.

9. What’s next? Do you have any upcoming projects that my readers should be aware of?

As an acquisition’s editor at Llewellyn, I’m currently spending most of my time working with other authors on their books, which is something that I deeply enjoy. Helping authors go from idea to book-in-hand is fantastic. We like to call ourselves “book midwives.” I do post the books that I work on publicly in my photo library on Facebook. It is called My Llewellyn Book Shelf. https://www.facebook.com/heather.greene.165

I am also a religion journalist, covering predominantly witchcraft and pagan related stories. Readers can follow my work through my Twitter account @miraselena01.

For all my antics in one place, www.heathergreene.net.

10. Parting shot! Ask us at The Magical Buffet any one questions.

What is your favorite witch movie and why?

That is a really tough question. When I was young, I went through a pretty hardcore “Bell, Book, and Candle” phase. Then I had the prerequisite “The Craft” love affair. My last witch movie obsession was “Practical Magic”, and I think that may be my favorite. It’s a mature take on magic and witchcraft, with a fantastic cast (Stockard Channing for life yo!), and a Stevie Nicks heavy soundtrack.

About Heather Greene:
Heather Greene is an editor, author, and journalist living in Atlanta, Georgia. She is currently an acquisitions editor with Llewellyn Worldwide, Ltd and a freelance religion journalist. She has a BA from Wesleyan University and an MA from Emory University both in Film Studies. Her work can be found at Religion News Service, Religion Unplugged, The Washington Post, Circle Magazine, and The Wild Hunt. Her book “Lights Camera Witchcraft,” tracing witches in American film and television, was released October 2021. She is a member of Covenant of the Goddess, Religion Newswriters Association, and Circle Sanctuary.

Shop your local indie bookstore <---This is an affiliate link to IndieBound, which supports independent bookstores throughout the United States. If you use this link to purchase the book, I will make a small commission at no additional cost to you.

Do you enjoy The Magical Buffet? Considering supporting The Magical Buffet on Patreon! For only $5 a month you’ll receive monthly tarot/oracle forecasts, classes, and behind the scenes updates! https://www.patreon.com/magicalbuffet

Tales of Witchcraft and Wonder

It is no secret that I love Claude Lecouteux. So, let’s not pretend that there’s a chance I won’t like one of his books. The real question is, why is THIS book just as worth reading as his other books?

Today we’re talking about “Tale of Witchcraft and Wonder: The Venomous Maiden and Other Stories of the Supernatural” by Claude and Corinne Lecouteux. This is another fascinating exploration of the evolution of lore from the Middle Ages. The format is wonderful because they share the oldest version of the story, and then they share iteration after iteration of the tale so you can read firsthand how they change. My description may come across as tedious, but to the contrary, it makes for a brisk, entertaining read. You’ll read tales of transformation, devilry, and magic.

If you’ve never tried a Lecouteux book, this is a wonderful place to start. “Tales of Witchcraft and Wonder” delivers on the title and maintains the level of accessible scholarship that we’ve come to associate with Lecouteux.

You can learn more here.

Shop your local indie bookstore <---This is an affiliate link to IndieBound, which supports independent bookstores throughout the United States. If you use this link to purchase the book, I will make a small commission at no additional cost to you.

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Favorite Things 2021

It is here again. That magical time of the year where I pretend Oprah and I are somehow on the same level and rivals by doing my annual “Favorite Things” list. As always, my list is superior to hers in every way.

If this is your first time here, “Welcome, where the hell have you been?” Also, you should know that I pick my top 10 favorite things that were featured on The Magical Buffet website since the previous year’s list was published. Every year it is a nerve-wracking task, but I always love bringing attention to some of the best stuff out there early enough in the gift giving season that you can do some shopping based off of my recommendations. So now, presented in no particular order, are my 10 “Favorite Things” for 2021.

1. The Art of the Occult: A Visual Sourcebook for the Modern Mystic by S. Elizabeth
With over 175 full color reproductions of art from the 15th century and earlier right up to modern times, this is an eye-opening look at the relationship between art, artist, and the occult.
You can read my original review here.

2. Witch Hunt: A Traveler’s Guide to the Power & Persecution of the Witch by Kristen J. Sollée
A wonderfully feminist, witch-ocentric travelogue.
You can read my original review here.

3. Dark Goddess Tarot by Ellen Lorenzi-Prince
This is the first of two tarot decks to make this year’s list. Both celebrate the divine feminine, I guess I have a type.
You can read my original review here.

4. The Divine Feminine Tao Te Ching by Rosemarie Anderson
2021 was the year I found my preferred translation of the Tao.
You can read my original review here.

5. The Ancestral Power of Amulets, Talismans, and Mascots: Folk Magic in Witchcraft and Religion by Nigel Pennick
I was already a Pennick fan, however as a person who makes talismans this book was destined to be a favorite.
You can read my original review here.

6. New World Witchery: A Trove of North American Folk Magic by Cory Thomas Hutcheson
Is this the North American Claude Lecouteux we’ve been waiting for? Or at least I’VE been waiting for? By all indications, yes!
You can read my original review here.

7. Iconic Tarot Decks: The History, Symbolism and Design of over 50 Decks by Sarah Bartlett
The next best thing to playing with tarot cards is reading about tarot cards.
You can read my original review here.

8. Mysteries of the Werewolf: Shapeshifting, Magic & Protection by Claude Lecouteux
Just when you thought you knew everything about werewolves, Lecouteux comes out with a new book.
You can read my original review here.

9. Intuitive Night Goddess Tarot by Linzi Silverman
Divine feminine tarot deck two!
You can read my original review here.

10. The Eclectic Witch’s Books of Shadows: Witchy Wisdom at Your Fingertips by Deborah Blake
It’s no secret that I love me some Deborah Blake, but trust me, this book is good.
You can read my original review here.

Inspired to take care of some shopping? For your convenience I created a Favorite Things 2021 on The Magical Buffet’s bookshop. Shopping through the bookshop not only supports The Magical Buffet, but independent bookstores throughout the United States!

Do you enjoy The Magical Buffet? Considering supporting The Magical Buffet on Patreon! For only $5 a month you will receive monthly tarot/oracle forecasts, classes, and behind the scenes updates! https://www.patreon.com/magicalbuffet