Medieval Lay Mystics

Christian History magazine is back with a new issue I thought many of you would be interested to check out, the latest issue is titled “Medieval Lay Mystics”.

Christian History Institute (CHI), publisher of Christian History magazine (CHM), announces its latest issue, titled: “Medieval Lay Mystics”. The entire issue explores a mysterious question for many Christians, historians and scholars – What did it look like and what did it feel like to be a medieval Christian?

Spanning four vivid centuries, from 1000 to 1473, CHM issue #127 takes an in-depth look at the lives of notable medieval mystics, especially those who were not ordained clergy.

By the twelfth century devout women, monks and hermits came out of seclusion to preach and minister to others, proclaiming the gospel in local languages so that common people could understand it. They called on both fellow laypeople and clergy to repent and enter a genuine relationship with Christ. This spiritual process, culminating in an inner, mystical union became known as mysticism.

Scholars agree, that around the twelfth century, a variety of forces led to a cultural and spiritual renewal among those living outside formal religious institutions and traditions. First by thousands, then by the tens of thousands, common people responded to the gospel. Thirsty for a vital Christian life, they fostered devotional lifestyles, joining various movements of piety and service to others that offered opportunities to grow spiritually.

Three centuries before the Reformation, scholars began to also translate the Bible into local languages. Outdoor preaching became common and itinerant preachers traveled across Europe calling people to a life of repentance. This led to 300 years of repeated revival movements and waves of spiritual renewal across Western Europe leading up to the Reformation, which began around 1500.

“People from these movements penned timeless devotional classics, many still popular, writing of their desire to reach a mystical oneness with the Christ they loved,” said the managing editor of Christian History, Jennifer Woodruff Tait. “Here, I think, is the point where we can connect their lives with ours. We both desire to learn how to be more devoted to Jesus.”

CH issue #127, contains 7 features and 4 shorter side-bar articles; a chronology time-line; an archive of rare art-work & photos; a ‘letter to the editor’ section and an extensive reading list compiled by the CHM editorial staff.

I read the issue and found it an interesting, worthwhile read. What’s great is, you can read this issue, all their past issues, and access all sorts of other resources for FREE on their website! You can find it all here.

Traditional Magic Spells for Protection & Healing Review and Giveaway

I have a hard time writing reviews for Claude Lecouteux’s books. They’re all dense tomes of knowledge, meticulously researched, and loaded with excerpts and references from medieval texts. One doesn’t casually breeze through one of his books, you slowly follow the path that he lays out before you. And his latest “Traditional Magic Spells for Protection and Healing” is no exception.

As usual Lecouteux turns his scholar’s eye towards highlighting the intersection of Christianity and Pagan beliefs, this time with medical practices tossed in. In medieval times health issues were a matter of body, the spiritual world, and spiritual concerns. Not only does Lecouteux outline means of diagnosis, but addresses the cures whether you’re being afflicted with an evil spell, or tormented by a demon. Incantations against wolf bite, using alum in water to help someone regain their speech, charms against demons, and obviously so much more!

“Traditional Magic Spells for Protection and Healing” is a must for magic nerds like myself. Honestly, every Claude Lecouteux book is a must own.

You can learn more here.

Guess what? Due to a mix up at Inner Traditions I have a copy of “Traditional Magic Spells for Protection and Healing” to give away!

The winner will be selected via the Rafflecopter contest below on Sunday, April 29th at 11:59 PM Eastern time. Good luck!

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Food & Faith

As most of you know by know, I’m quite the fan of food and learning about religion. That’s why when Christian History Magazine emailed me about their latest issue I was pretty intrigued and wanted to share it with you. The issue is “Faith & Food, 2000 Years of Feasting and Fasting”.

As they explain:
This issue is packed with tid-bits of information about foods mentioned in the Bible and Christianity’s holiest meal, the Lord’s Supper. Many more meals and meal traditions have been documented, among them: potlucks and fellowship meals, soup kitchens and church gardens, Christian cookbooks and Christian diets, the temperance movement, feasting, fasting and practices of hospitality.

Articles:
Good food from the good book, A partial primer on biblical foods by the editor

What should Christians cook?, Faith in the kitchen by Jennifer Trafton – Jennifer Trafton, author, artist, creative writing teacher, and former managing editor of Christian History.

The royal way, Feasting or fasting? the constant Christian tension in the public square by Kathleen Mulhern, who teaches Christian formation and church history at Denver Seminary.

Fasting: from the Orthodox front lines, we should consider the spiritual discipline of not eating by Frederica Mathewes-Green, author of Welcome to the Orthodox Church and numerous other books, and frequent essayist and public speaker.

Recipes, recipe suggestions from friends of Christian History by Josh Hale, Barbara J. Hale, Frederica Mathewes-Green, Julie Byrne, Mary Anne Tietjen Byrne, Quita Sauerwein

Everyday substances, heavenly gifts, From the beginning, the holiest Christian meal used everyday food by Andrew McGowan – J. L. Caldwell McFaddin and Rosine B. McFaddin Professor of Anglican Studies and Pastoral Theology and dean of Berkeley Divinity School at Yale. He is the author of Ancient Christian Worship and Ascetic Eucharists.

Eating (and not eating) with the church fathers, Things church fathers said about food compiled by Jennifer Woodruff Tait – Managing editor, Christian History.

Raise a juice box to the temperance movement, Getting unfermented wine from the vineyard by Jennifer Woodruff Tait – Managing editor, Christian History.

What would Jesus buy?, How nineteenth-century Christians transformed our grocery aisles by Matt Forster – freelance author living in Clarkston, Michigan, and a frequent contributor to Christian History.

The sacred duty, a Seventh-day Adventist menu by LaVonne Neff – freelance author and blogger at LivelyDust, raised an Adventist.

From Cana to Jell-O, Christian fellowship meals: feeding the hungry and each other by Barton E. Price – director of the Centers for Academic Success and Achievement at Indiana University–Purdue University Ft. Wayne and teaches history, music, and religious studies.

Welcoming the Stranger, Serving the guest—including with bread by Carmen Acevedo Butcher – lecturer at the University of California at Berkeley and the author of Man of Blessing: A Life of St. Benedict.

I haven’t read the entire issue yet, but I’ve read a few articles so far and I find it interesting. The articles are well written and the art is beautiful. Are you interested? Well good news, you can read it for free online at the Christian History Institute’s website! And if you like what you read, you can subscribe with a donation of any amount you choose.

Wild Wild Country

You guys, I got a press release for a documentary series debuting on Netflix March 16th that looks crazy. I’m going to want to watch it and I thought you might too. Here’s the story:

When the world’s most controversial guru builds a utopian city in the Oregon desert, a massive conflict with local ranchers ensues; producing the first bioterror attack in US history, the largest case of illegal wiretapping ever recorded, and the world’s biggest collection of Rolls-Royce automobiles. Over six episodes, Directors Chapman Way and Maclain Way (“The Battered Bastards of Baseball”) and executive producers Mark and Jay Duplass (Duplass Brothers Productions) take viewers back to this pivotal, yet largely forgotten moment in American cultural history, one in which our national tolerance for the separation of church and state was sorely tested. Wild Wild Country is historical filmmaking brought to life on an epic scale. It’s a tale so wild that seeing means barely believing.

And here’s the trailer:

Spiritual Places

I just read the most beautiful book, “Spiritual Places” by Sarah Baxter. Baxter is a travel journalist that has compiled an impressive list of spiritual places to visit. Some are seen as spiritual by their very nature, and other locations are spiritual because of the places of worship built there. 25 places are discussed, ranging from Easter Island to Wittenberg Castle Church. Baxter discusses the location’s history, interesting facts about, suggestions for when visiting and more!

This alone would make “Spiritual Places” a great read, but instead of stock photos for these locations someone (author, publisher, not sure who) decided to have illustrations by Harry and Zanna Goldhawk used in their place. The art is wonderful. It takes an interesting, but potentially stale, book and transports it to another level. Suddenly it feels like you’re reading a whimsical storybook or fairy tale, except the stories are true!

Camino de Santiago

The writing, the art, and the hardcover format makes “Spiritual Places” an excellent gift idea for just about anyone, including yourself.

To learn more, visit here.

10 Questions with James Morgante

1. Out of all the subjects available to study, what made you decide to research the connection between diet and spirituality?

Back in the mid-1970s when I was searching for alternatives in psychology, I discovered the holistic health movement and its paradigm of the interacting dimensions of body, mind, and spirit, along with Eastern traditions like macrobiotics and Buddhism that emphasize the consciousness effects of diet. I was intrigued by the relationship and wondered about an explanation. This led to a master’s thesis in a holistic psychology program entitled “Nutrition, Consciousness, Spiritual Teachings, and Scientific Models.” The results were mixed. Some scientific models can help to explain nutrition’s consciousness effects, but only to a degree. More importantly, it became clear that nutrition may affect the growth of consciousness, but it shouldn’t be overemphasized at the expense of other factors like behavior and attitudinal changes. It also became clear that both vegetal and meat diets had advantages and disadvantages. The Yogi Diet takes all of this up and works it out in more detail, while also adding a special focus on grains (one of the keys to a vegetarian diet) and their critique by the low-carbohydrate movement. Ultimately, the book affirms the religious and spiritual importance of diet and the relevance of vegetarianism, but cautions against extremes.

2. Even though your book, “The Yogi Diet”, says it’s about “Spirituality and the Question of Vegetarianism” you spend an ample amount of time discussing secular diets such as Atkins, Paleo, the evolution of America’s Food Pyramid, etc. How did those topics make their way into the book?

Spiritual traditions concern themselves with diet because diet affects health, and health in the holistic sense of body, mind, and spirit. Their special concern and expertise involve dietary effects on the spirit and spiritual development. But effects on the body and bodily health are also of concern, and here secular paradigms have much to say. If spiritual traditions, for example, recommend vegetarianism (as many do), because of the spiritual effect, the question remains as to whether a vegetarian diet is also healthy for the body. Conversely, if spiritual traditions denigrate meat and animal foods because of adverse spiritual effects, then we can expect to see such adverse effects reflected with the health of the body as well. In fact, the total record shows ambiguity on the part of religious and spiritual traditions on the question of vegetarianism because of advantages and disadvantages. Arguably, those same advantages and disadvantages, as well as the conditions determining them, are visible in the debates of secular paradigms focused on bodily health. In this sense, secular diets provide a check and a corroboration of spiritual views about vegetarianism. The goal of The Yogi Diet is to foster wisdom by synthesizing various points of view. In this process, secular views are also important.

3. You started your winding tale of spirituality and diet with Hinduism. Why start there?

The book begins (and ends) with the Bhagavad-Gita’s dietary teaching because it is archetypical in several respects. First, its concern is health, or the nourishing and strengthening effect on the “mental, vital, and physical forces.” Second, its perspective is holistic, comprising the totality of the human being per its conception (i.e., the mental, vital, and physical forces; Western traditions speak of body, mind, and spirit). Thirdly, its teaching is unspecific, not naming individual foods, but judging diets by the health effect (i.e., different diets may well be appropriate for different individuals if the effect is healthy). Yet another archetypal aspect is the relative modesty of the importance attached to diet (four verses within a spiritual teaching comprising 700 verses). Finally, the Bhagavad-Gita as a Hindu spiritual teaching cannot be separated from the Hindu religious teaching of The Laws of Manu (chapter 5), of which the Gita shows familiarity. The Laws of Manu include detailed instructions about allowable and prohibited foods (like the Mosaic dietary code) as well as the conditions which allow and prohibit the consumption of meat. The Laws allow meat, but they enjoin minimal consumption and even avoidance as much as possible as well. Thus, the teachings of the Gita and the Laws of Manu complement one another. The religious perspective of the Laws (religion understood as the rules and practices governing a tradition) allows meat while questioning overconsumption or unnecessary consumption. The spiritual perspective of the Bhagavad-Gita (spirituality understood as the extra step of deliberately pursuing the path of “the good, the true, and the beautiful”) outlines a dietary criterion — health — that requires discrimination. Both together make up the totality of the tradition’s view about vegetarianism, which in the case of Hinduism is appropriately ambiguous.

4. Were you surprised how many variables play into a person deciding what to eat?

Yes, I was and am surprised. When I first began to consider the topic of diet and spirituality, I thought that vegetarianism related to spirituality in a very simplistic way — eat vegetarian and become more spiritual. It turns out to be much more complicated than that, as evidenced by the ambiguity of religious and spiritual traditions about vegetarianism. We are all individuals, which means that we have individual capacities and needs, and the ambiguity about vegetarianism reflects this. I also think it’s fair to say that widespread interest in low-carbohydrate diets reflects to some extent an intuitive grasp of the need for animal food. As I indicate in The Yogi Diet’s introduction, I wanted to grapple with the low-carbohydrate movement and its critique of grains and the agricultural revolution, but expected the movement to reveal itself as regressive because of the conventional dietary wisdom that de-emphasized animal foods because of potential deleterious health effects. In contrast, I found that alleged adverse effects depended on variables such as the totality of the diet and even food quality. Mixing carbohydrates and fats can quickly lead to health problems, but low-carbohydrate diets themselves like the Atkins Diet can, in fact, improve health. And then there are other considerations — like the inability of some people to generate sufficient fat, thereby needing fat from animal foods; the beneficial stimulation that meat can provide from a spiritual perspective for living in the world; and the importance of spiritual practice to keep the effect of a vegetarian diet healthy. Thus, there are many variables to consider that invalidate simplistic associations like “eat vegetarian and become more spiritual.” Such a notion, in fact, can lead to trouble.

5. Do you personally feel people should make dietary decisions based on their religion?

I would say that the religious and spiritual perspective on diet is something important for everyone to consider, namely, that diet has effects beyond those on the body on the mind and spirit as well. Yet the perspective of one religious tradition alone may be insufficient. Jainism, for example, requires vegetarianism, yet the question remains as to whether vegetarianism can healthy for everyone. Moreover, Western Christianity has largely come to ignore the significance of biblical dietary restrictions like the blood prohibition (Genesis 9: 4 and Acts 15) for keeping the vegetarian undercurrent alive. A synthetic understanding of the totality of religious, spiritual, and even secular views is the key to developing sound judgment.

6. What dietary prohibition did you find the most surprising?

The Jainist prohibitions against fermented foods to avoid harming microorganisms and against root vegetables to avoid uprooting plants and thereby harming them. As for surprise about what is allowed, or what can make something allowed, there is the indication of Swami Prahhupada (an interpreter of the Bhagavad-Gita’s dietary teaching) that spoiled foods and those cooked more than three hours previously are untouchable unless blessed (prayer trumps everything)!

7. Let’s get to the question my drunken readers want asked, what about alcohol? Is it good or bad?

Appendix B goes into detail about alcohol. Briefly, religious and spiritual thinking about alcohol is as diverse as it is about vegetarianism. Nevertheless, many weighty considerations argue against its use, particularly for spiritual seekers. One important consideration indicates that alcohol usurps ego functions, which are important for spiritual development. In this sense, alcohol can be considered to have a counter-evolutionary effect.

8. Now that “The Yogi Diet” is out, what is your next project?

As I indicate on my Goodreads author profile, I think of the The Yogi Diet as the first of an interrelated trilogy. The second, Mother Cow, will take up cow worship in “third-world” Indian culture as a reflection of the importance of lacto-vegetarianism and contrast such a devotional attitude with the treatment of farm animals including cows in “first-world” U.S. culture where they are exempt from animal cruelty laws. The third will focus on the complementary nature of reincarnation and resurrection, two afterlife teachings associated with the cultivation of grain (chapter 6 in The Yogi Diet) that are keys to realizing the vegan-vegetarian religious ideal (chapter 8).

9. What did you eat today?

For breakfast, I had a fried egg and a bowl of steel-cut oats, soaked overnight and rinsed (very important for removing antinutrients), then cooked and topped with extra-virgin olive oil, some honey and coconut sugar, shredded coconut, raisins, banana, and yogurt. This is my typical breakfast, but the grain and toppings vary. For lunch, I had a salmon burger with sauce, sauerkraut, and lettuce on a piece of whole-grain bread, along with a few raw mini-carrots (the salmon burger is untypical; a veggie burger or a rice bowl with some dairy is more typical). For dinner, I had toast with butter, miso, and tahini, a salad, and some cooked vegetables. Occasionally I eat fish, and less frequently, chicken. I am sympathetic to the vegetarian cause, but not a strict vegetarian.

10. Parting shot! Ask us here at The Magical Buffet any one question.

Which is more important — food variety or food quality?

I have to say food quality. What’s the point of a wide variety if it tastes bland or stale?

About James Morgante:
James Morgante, MDiv (religion), MA (psychology), has worked in ministry, social services and teaching, and has been studying the relationship between spirituality and nutrition for over 30 years.
Shortly after receiving his undergraduate psychology degree, he began a pursuit of alternatives in psychology that led him to the holistic health movement in the 1970s, and to an eventual ministry focus. From 2007-2015 he taught English in China, all while maintaining his studies in vegetarianism and spirituality.

He has always been keenly interested in the subject of vegetarianism and the spiritual life, wanting to learn why some religious teachings advocate vegetarianism (yet most don’t require it), why some have an ambivalent attitude, and why some pay no attention to the subject, or even reject it. The Yogi Diet is the culmination of his studies.

James speaks to church and hospital groups. He lives in Seattle, Wash.

You can learn more here.

Practical Magic Review and Giveaway!

Let’s be totally real here. There are hundreds, probably thousands, of beginner’s guides to magic and witchcraft. I could easily recommend a couple before ever having read “Practical Magic: A Beginner’s Guide to Crystals, Horoscopes, Psychics, and Spells” by Nikki Van De Car. However I’m here to tell you that THIS is the one you give to others (and possibly as a gift to yourself too).

“Practical Magic” briefly touches on every little thing that floats in the realm of magic. Chakras, herbs, crystals, astrology, Pagan holidays, auras, tarot, lucid dreaming, and even more are covered in this 176 page book. The author’s writing is clear and accessible. She makes every topic interesting and a thing you would want to explore more in depth.

The reason this is THE gift to give is not only the broad scope, but this book is BEAUTIFUL. I mean absolutely stunning. Hard cover, heavy paper stock, full color and loaded with fabulous illustrations by Katie Vernon. The whole look of the book is magical in appearance.

This photo doesn't do the art justice.

This photo doesn't do the art justice.

Not to get all infomercial on you, but wait, there’s more! You know how stores have those irresistible little boxes with different themes at the checkout? I’m a sucker for those and there is one that goes with “Practical Magic”! This little gem is packed with goodies: a piece of rose quartz and tiger’s eye, a fill in astrological chart with adorable stickers, three sheets of temporary tattoos, and of course a tiny 48 page book to help you put it all to use!

Look at all of it!

You can learn more about “Practical Magic” here: http://www.runningpress.com/book/practical-magic/9780762463077

But don’t leave this post yet! The great folks at Running Press gave me a “Practical Magic” book and kit to give away to one lucky Magical Buffet reader! Just do what the nice Rafflecopter below asks and you’ll be entered! Starts now, ends at 11:59pm Eastern time on Sept. 4, 2017. Open internationally, must be 18 or older to enter.

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